WSIB approved

Emergency First Aid Training

First Aid Courses

Public First Aid Courses

  • Sat Oct 5 2019 9 am – 5 pm

    Emergency First Aid & CPR/AED Level C

    Location: Toronto

    Contact to Register

  • Sat Oct 5 2019 9 am – 5 pm

    Standard First Aid & CPR/AED Level C Re-certification

    Location: Toronto

    Contact to Register

  • Sat–Sun Oct 5–6 2019 9 am – 5 pm

    Standard First Aid & CPR/AED Level C

    Location: Toronto

    Contact to Register

First Aid emergencies catch people off guard and there’s nothing worse than being unprepared. You have a sinking feeling in your gut as your anxiety takes over causing sheer panic and the feeling of helplessness. After completing of our First Aid programs, you will feel the confidence and empowerment required to tackle any First Aid emergencies you come across.

All of our First Aid courses also include certification for Infant and child choking, CPR, and how to use an AED. An EMS instructor trains you at your location at a time of your choosing, available 7 days a week. At the end of the course, all students take home a certification card and a free First Aid/CPR book.

Our 1-day, Emergency First Aid course is our basic course, while our 2-day, Standard First Aid course is more in-depth and a WSIB mandated course under Regulation 1101.

Programs approved by

  • Canada
  • WSIB Ontario

Emergency First Aid & CPR/AED Level C Course

You will learn how to deal with life-threatening medical emergencies and how to treat them in a simple and effective manner, prior to EMS arrival.

Instruction

  • 6½ hours.
  • Training taught by an EMS instructor.
  • Training occurs at your location.
  • Training offered 7 days a week, any time of day.

Certification

  • 3-year Emergency First Aid with CPR/AED Level C, Adult, Child, Infant.

Topics covered

Take-home

  • Certification card and optional wall certificate (or as required by legislation) presented at the end of your course.
  • Free First-Aid/CPR book for each student to keep.

Book Course

⇧ Course List

Standard First Aid & CPR/AED Level C Course

WSIB Mandated Regulation 1101

You will learn how to deal with additional life-threatening medical emergencies, above and beyond what is delivered in the one-day Emergency First Aid course. This broader, more in-depth course places you into real life medical emergencies via hands-on practical skills stations and scenarios.

Instruction

  • 13 hours (2 days).
  • Training taught by an EMS instructor.
  • Training occurs at your location.
  • Training offered 7 days a week, any time of day.

Certification

  • 3-year Standard First Aid with CPR/AED Level C, Adult, Child Infant.

Topics covered

Take-home

  • Certification card and optional wall certificate (or as required by legislation) presented at the end of your course.
  • Free First-Aid/CPR book for each student to keep.

Book Course

⇧ Course List

Standard First Aid & CPR/AED Level C Recertification Course

You are eligible for this one-day recertification course if you still hold a valid Standard First Aid/CPR certification.

Instruction

  • 6½ hours.
  • Training taught by an EMS instructor.
  • Training occurs at your location.
  • Training offered 7 days a week, any time of day.

Certification

  • 3-year Standard First Aid and CPR/AED Level C, Adult, Child, Infant.

Take-home

  • Certification card and optional wall certificate (or as required by legislation) presented at the end of your course.
  • Free First-Aid/CPR book for each student to keep.

Book Course

⇧ Course List

  • 9-1-1 information

    Taking charge in any emergency situation is the critical first step in helping a patient. Be prepared by knowing the typical questions and key information you will be asked by the 9-1-1 call-taker.

    ⇧ All Topics

  • Protecting against disease transmission

    One of the biggest deterrents for bystanders in helping a patient is the fear of disease transmission. Make this a non-factor by knowing how to protect yourself with the proper knowledge and equipment.

    ⇧ All Topics

  • Heart attack

    Heart muscle cells die when they don’t receive enough oxygen. Understanding risk factors and the signs and symptoms is crucial to limit damage. Jaw pain, indigestion, and weakness are common in women. Speed of treatment is key to survival.

    ⇧ All Topics

  • Stroke

    Brain cells die when they don’t receive enough oxygen, which can result in permanent disability or death. “Time is brain.” Knowing the F.A.S.T acronym can save a life. Administering aspirin to these patients can kill them.

    ⇧ All Topics

  • Choking

    Choking can happen to anyone, at anytime. A severe choking emergency can cause unconsciousness and even death. Seconds count. Prevention and rapid treatment will save lives.

    ⇧ All Topics

  • CPR

    Anyone of any age, gender, race, and physical fitness level is at risk for sudden cardiac arrest. CPR can decrease the risk of brain damage and brain death in these patients. Knowing when and how to perform CPR can save a life.

    ⇧ All Topics

  • AED

    Patients in cardiac arrest are unconscious and not breathing. Their heart is beating erratically and needs to be reset. A defibrillator delivers a shock to a patient’s heart in hopes of resynchronizing it. Less than 5% of patients will survive a cardiac arrest if there is a delay in defibrillation.

    ⇧ All Topics

  • Bleeding

    The average adult has 5 liters of blood volume pumping throughout their body. Severe internal and external bleeding can be life -threatening and must be treated immediately. Bandages and dressings need to be applied properly to stop the bleeding.

    ⇧ All Topics

  • Diabetes

    In order to effectively recognize and treat a patient who is having a diabetic emergency, you must first understand how the disease works. A balance of insulin and sugar is crucial for these patients to prevent emergencies. Minutes are all it takes for diabetic emergencies to occur.

    ⇧ All Topics

  • Asthma

    A life-threatening asthma attack has been described as trying to breathe through a stir stick. Mucus buildup and swelling in the lungs prevent the patient from getting oxygen. Immediate First Aid is required to prevent further complications and death.

    ⇧ All Topics

  • Anaphylaxis

    Signs and symptoms of severe allergic reactions are generally quick to begin after exposure to the patient’s allergen. Fatalities from allergic reactions generally occur within the first hour. Learn how to recognize these reactions using the F.A.S.T acronym and what medications are needed to save a life.

    ⇧ All Topics

  • Burns

    Burns have the potential to cause devastating injuries and can result in extensive damage as well as emotional and physical scarring. The degree of burn and the body surface area affected can be the difference between long-term disability and death.

    ⇧ All Topics

  • Head Injury

    Head and spinal injuries are potentially life-threatening and can lead to paralysis, permanent disability, and death. Falls from heights and sports injuries are common causes. Improper handling of these patients can be catastrophic.

    ⇧ All Topics

  • Fractures

    Fractures can range from mild to severe depending on what caused the injury and what bones are affected. Pain, deformity, internal bleeding and infection can result. Immobilization and splinting can reduce the risk of further injury.

    ⇧ All Topics

  • Seizures

    A temporary change in behavior or consciousness caused by abnormal electrical activity in the brain. Seizures can produce confusion, uncontrolled muscle jerking and other bodily injury. High fever, diabetic emergencies and head injuries are common causes of seizure.

    ⇧ All Topics

  • Eye injuries

    Injuries to the eye can affect the bones surrounding the eyeball as well as the eyeball itself. Safety measures to prevent eye injuries can decrease the risk by 90%. Improper handling of eye injuries can result in further damage and permanent vision loss.

    ⇧ All Topics

  • Overdose and poisoning

    A poison is defined as any substance that enters the body and has the potential to cause serious injury, disability or death. There are four main routes of entry that poisons can enter the body. Recognizing hazard symbols and labels can decrease your risk of exposure and keep you safe.

    ⇧ All Topics

  • Hot and cold weather emergencies

    A core body temperature of 36.8 C or 98.6° F is what millions of cells in the human body thrive on to maintain a good balance for optimal body functioning. When the outside temperature gets too hot or too cold, severe medical emergencies can occur. Hypothermia and hyperthermia can have deadly consequences.

    ⇧ All Topics